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stevewinterphoto

@stevewinterphoto / Steve Winter

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0 tag and 7 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto Zakouma National Park’s six black rhinos have been dehorned. The horns were removed and transported away from the park to a secure location in the nation’s capital. In addition to these security and protective measures, a horn trimming regime will continue on a frequent basis going forward. The dehorning, which was part of the initial plan in caring for these rhinos in Zakouma, was carried out by experienced vets who took every step to ensure that dehorning was done safely and did not cause any harm to the rhino. This step was carefully researched and planned, and studies suggest there is no long-term or social impact of dehorning, as long as all the rhinos in an area are dehorned. There are fewer than 5,000 wild black rhinos remaining in the world today – which is the result of being heavily targeted by poachers who are killing these animals, who have been around for millions of years, simply for the illegal sale of their horns. In a historic move, the first six black rhinos were reintroduced to Zakouma National Parkin May bringing back the species after a nearly 50-year absence. Dehorning them is one of the many security measures we are taking to reduce the risk of poaching. We have spent the last eight years making Zakouma safe for these rhinos, and all the other wildlife in the park thanks to our rangers and community-based conservation initiatives.Together with the government of Chad, our rangers, and the surrounding communities we are ensuring these rare black rhinos are protected and have an opportunity to breed and thrive for the benefit of future generations to come. Zakouma_national_park @africanparksnetwork @CanonUSA @reddigitalcinema @natgeocreative
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0 tag and 10 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto I returned from @Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork , one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks . If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they just reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork @CanonUSA
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0 tag and 9 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto Everything is connected - at the height of the dry season all animals come to water - such amazing abundance! I just returned from @Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork , one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork ). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they just reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, ha
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0 tag and 10 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto A young elephant shaking his head to show me who is boss! Everything is connected - at the height of the dry season all animals come to water - such amazing abundance! I just returned from @Zakouma_National_Park in Chad, @africanparksnetwork , one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork ). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they just reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods. What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, decency and civility. @africanparksnetwork
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0 tag and 12 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto Everything is connected - at the height of the dry season all animals come to water - such amazing abundance! I just returned from Zakouma National Park in Chad, one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is one of the parks of the groundbreaking conservation group African Parks. If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants and giraffe and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges - https://www.african-parks.org This is a hopeful story about the revival of a highly threatened species, as well as the trajectory of Zakouma - a park that was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity but has been transformed into a secure and flourishing park since 2010. Elephants had experienced a 95% loss from rampant poaching prior to African Parks’ involvement. Poaching drove a massive decline in the elephant population, from 4,000 individuals in 2002 to just 450 in 2010. African Parks assumed management of Zakouma in 2010, and due to effective law enforcement measures and community networks, poaching has been practically eliminated with only a few individuals being lost in the past seven years. The elephant population is finally on the rise; with over 550 individuals counted in 2016, this is the first time elephants have been on the increase in over a decade. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The local men and women are trained as guards for the anti-poaching patrols. Who knows the area and people better than the local people – then they also have secure jobs to support their families and communities! They have jobs in other parts of the park also including tourism and management. This is truly a remarkable effort to repopulate and protect African Parks. @AfricanParksNetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto @Zakouma_National_Park @natgeocreative @natgeowild @CanonUSA @reddigitalcinema
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0 tag and 10 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto One lion being chased away from a female by his brother!! I just returned from Zakouma National Park in Chad, one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is one of the parks of the groundbreaking conservation group African Parks. If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants and giraffe and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges - https://www.african-parks.org This is a hopeful story about the revival of a highly threatened species, as well as the trajectory of Zakouma - a park that was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity but has been transformed into a secure and flourishing park since 2010. Elephants had experienced a 95% loss from rampant poaching prior to African Parks’ involvement. Poaching drove a massive decline in the elephant population, from 4,000 individuals in 2002 to just 450 in 2010. African Parks assumed management of Zakouma in 2010, and due to effective law enforcement measures and community networks, poaching has been practically eliminated with only a few individuals being lost in the past seven years. The elephant population is finally on the rise; with over 550 individuals counted in 2016, this is the first time elephants have been on the increase in over a decade. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The local men and women are trained as guards for the anti-poaching patrols. Who knows the area and people better than the local people – then they also have secure jobs to support their families and communities! They have jobs in other parts of the park also including tourism and management. This is truly a remarkable effort to repopulate and protect African Parks. @AfricanParksNetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto @Zakouma_National_Park @natgeocreative @natgeowild
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0 tag and 10 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto what an amazing, beautiful, awe-inspiring situation Here they come - do I stay or step back! I just returned from Zakouma National Park in Chad, one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is one of the parks of the groundbreaking conservation group African Parks. If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants and giraffe and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges - https://www.african-parks.org Elephants that were once so fearful of people now feel safe enough to come to the park Director’s home to drink from the waterhole 10 meters away – I am in a underground hide photographing. This is a hopeful story about the revival of a highly threatened species, as well as the trajectory of Zakouma - a park that was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity but has been transformed into a secure and flourishing park since 2010. Elephants had experienced a 95% loss from rampant poaching prior to African Parks’ involvement. Poaching drove a massive decline in the elephant population, from 4,000 individuals in 2002 to just 450 in 2010. African Parks assumed management of Zakouma in 2010, and due to effective law enforcement measures and community networks, poaching has been practically eliminated with only a few individuals being lost in the past seven years. The elephant population is finally on the rise; with over 550 individuals counted in 2016, this is the first time elephants have been on the increase in over a decade. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The local men and women are trained as guards for the anti-poaching patrols. Who knows the area and people better than the local people – then they also have secure jobs to support their families and communities! They have jobs in other parts of the park also including tourism and management. This is truly a remarkable effort to repopulate and protect African Parks. @AfricanParksNetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto @Zakouma_National_Park @natgeocreative @natgeowild
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0 tag and 10 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto A male lion startled by something - drops his morning snack! I just returned from Zakouma National Park in Chad, one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is one of the parks of the groundbreaking conservation group African Parks. If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants and giraffe and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges - https://www.african-parks.org Elephants that were once so fearful of people now feel safe enough to come to the park Director’s home to drink from the waterhole 10 meters away – I am in a underground hide photographing. This is a hopeful story about the revival of a highly threatened species, as well as the trajectory of Zakouma - a park that was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity but has been transformed into a secure and flourishing park since 2010. Elephants had experienced a 95% loss from rampant poaching prior to African Parks’ involvement. Poaching drove a massive decline in the elephant population, from 4,000 individuals in 2002 to just 450 in 2010. African Parks assumed management of Zakouma in 2010, and due to effective law enforcement measures and community networks, poaching has been practically eliminated with only a few individuals being lost in the past seven years. The elephant population is finally on the rise; with over 550 individuals counted in 2016, this is the first time elephants have been on the increase in over a decade. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The local men and women are trained as guards for the anti-poaching patrols. Who knows the area and people better than the local people – then they also have secure jobs to support their families and communities! They have jobs in other parts of the park also including tourism and management. This is truly a remarkable effort to repopulate and protect African Parks. @AfricanParksNetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto @Zakouma_National_Park @natgeocreative @natgeowild
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0 tag and 13 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto I just returned from Zakouma National Park in Chad, one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is one of the parks of the groundbreaking conservation group African Parks. If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants and giraffe and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges - https://www.african-parks.org Elephants that were once so fearful of people now feel safe enough to come to the park Director’s home to drink from the waterhole 10 meters away – I am in a underground hide photographing. This is a hopeful story about the revival of a highly threatened species, as well as the trajectory of Zakouma - a park that was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity but has been transformed into a secure and flourishing park since 2010. Elephants had experienced a 95% loss from rampant poaching prior to African Parks’ involvement. Poaching drove a massive decline in the elephant population, from 4,000 individuals in 2002 to just 450 in 2010. African Parks assumed management of Zakouma in 2010, and due to effective law enforcement measures and community networks, poaching has been practically eliminated with only a few individuals being lost in the past seven years. The elephant population is finally on the rise; with over 550 individuals counted in 2016, this is the first time elephants have been on the increase in over a decade. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The local men and women are trained as guards for the anti-poaching patrols. Who knows the area and people better than the local people – then they also have secure jobs to support their families and communities! They have jobs in other parts of the park also including tourism and management. This is truly a remarkable effort to repopulate and protect African Parks. @AfricanParksNetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto @Zakouma_National_Park @natgeocreative @natgeowild @paramounttheattecr @canonusa @reddigitalcinema
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0 tag and 10 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto I just returned from Zakouma National Park in Chad, one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is one of the parks of the groundbreaking conservation group African Parks. If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants and giraffe and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges - https://www.african-parks.org Elephants that were once so fearful of people now feel safe enough to come to the park Director’s home to drink from the waterhole 10 meters away – I am in a underground hide photographing. This is a hopeful story about the revival of a highly threatened species, as well as the trajectory of Zakouma - a park that was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity but has been transformed into a secure and flourishing park since 2010. Elephants had experienced a 95% loss from rampant poaching prior to African Parks’ involvement. Poaching drove a massive decline in the elephant population, from 4,000 individuals in 2002 to just 450 in 2010. African Parks assumed management of Zakouma in 2010, and due to effective law enforcement measures and community networks, poaching has been practically eliminated with only a few individuals being lost in the past seven years. The elephant population is finally on the rise; with over 550 individuals counted in 2016, this is the first time elephants have been on the increase in over a decade. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The local men and women are trained as guards for the anti-poaching patrols. Who knows the area and people better than the local people – then they also have secure jobs to support their families and communities! They have jobs in other parts of the park also including tourism and management. This is truly a remarkable effort to repopulate and protect African Parks. @AfricanParksNetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto @Zakouma_National_Park @natgeocreative @natgeowild
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0 tag and 11 profiles in description@africanparksnetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto I just returned from Zakouma National Park in Chad, one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is one of a kind - @alexbraczkowski and I said “I have never seen anything like this before” Zakouma is one of the parks of the groundbreaking conservation group African Parks. If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards herds of elephants and no tourists - go to Zakouma!! Your tourism dollars go towards protecting the park, and the people and wildlife that live there. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The local men and women are trained as guards for the anti-poaching patrols. Who knows the area and people better than the local people – then they also have secure jobs to support their families and communities! They have jobs in other parts of the park also including tourism and management. This is truly a remarkable effort to repopulate and protect African Parks. @AfricanParksNetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto @Zakouma_National_Park @natgeocreative @natgeowild
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0 tag and 11 profiles in description@natgeo @stevewinterphoto @africanparksnetwork I just returned from Zakouma National Park in Chad, one of the most amazing ecosystems on the planet – I have been to so many places throughout my career @natgeo – the amazing abundance of life found here is off the charts. Zakouma is one of a kind - @alexbraczkowski and I said “I have never seen anything like this before” Zakouma is one of the parks of the groundbreaking conservation group African Parks. If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards herds of elephants and no tourists - go to Zakouma!! Your tourism dollars go towards protecting the park, and the people and wildlife that live there. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The local men and women are trained as guards for the anti-poaching patrols. Who knows the area and people better than the local people – then they also have secure jobs to support their families and communities! They have jobs in other parts of the park also including tourism and management. This is truly a remarkable effort to repopulate and protect African Parks. @AfricanParksNetwork @natgeo @stevewinterphoto @Zakouma_National_Park @natgeocreative @natgeowild
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